Sunday, December 18, 2016

Wetlands Projects

Over the course of the last month, we have been learning about the importance of wetlands to people, animals, and the environment. The kids were presented with a situation: should we protect the wetlands at Bear Creek, or should we build playgrounds where the wetlands currently stand. To help the kids make an informed choice, we also researched the benefits of exercise on kids' brains and bodies.

Once we learned about wetlands and the benefits of exercise, the kids chose a claim. Would they protect the wetlands or would the choose to build a playground? The students overwhelmingly chose to protect the wetlands, but we did have some people choose to build the playgrounds. Once they decided upon their claim, they had to figure out how they would get their message across to our audience. Students chose letters, blog posts / articles, books, podcasts, movies, SmartAmp presentations, and posters. They have been working hard to polish these presentations so that they will convince you to agree with their claim.

Now it's your turn to choose! You can follow the links to our kidblog sites or check out the updates to this post, to gather your information. Then we'd like you to vote. Will you choose to protect the wetlands, or will you choose to build more playgrounds? The choice is yours!

Here are the links to follow:
You can listen to some podcasts right here!

Check out Gabe's podcast in support of building playgrounds:


Listen to Haley support the wetlands:

Brooke supports saving the wetlands:

Gabe S. threw his support behind the wetlands:

Nick believes we should save the wetlands:

Sarah thinks we should save the wetlands, too:


You can also watch this very entertaining movie by Toren!


And here is an informative and entertaining video by Olivia!

video

Check back often because more projects will be added throughout the week. Once you feel as though you have the information you need, please cast your vote:


Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Comparing Numbers - AM Class

Over the last few weeks, we have been trying to answer the question, "What do numbers mean?" To answer this question, we have focused on learning the different places digits can "park" in, how their value changes in each place, and how to tell the differences between numbers.

To demonstrate their knowledge the Bair's Den AM Class used the Show Me app to complete their comparing and ordering assessments. This app allowed everybody to talk about their thinking as they were doing the work. While not all of the Show Mes are posted, you can view several of them by visiting our class's Show Me page. You can find your child's work by looking for their name. Feel free to ask us any questions about our projects.


Comparing Numbers - AM Class

Over the last few weeks, we have been trying to answer the question, "What do numbers mean?" To answer this question, we have focused on learning the different places digits can "park" in, how their value changes in each place, and how to tell the differences between numbers.

To demonstrate their knowledge the Bair's Den AM Class used the Show Me app to complete their comparing and ordering assessments. This app allowed everybody to talk about their thinking as they were doing the work. While not all of the Show Mes are posted, you can view several of them by visiting our class's Show Me page. You can find your child's work by looking for their name. Feel free to ask us any questions about our projects.

Be on the look out for the PM Class's slideshows coming soon!

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

School Spirit and Word of the Week

This week's word of the week is thoughtful. Fourth grade has been having some trouble at times when teachers aren't around, so we are working together to be more thoughtful about our words and our actions.

On Monday we talked about this quote from Margaret Meade, a famous anthropologist during the 1960's:


We changed the word citizens to students, and we changed the word world to school. And then we talked about how things might change if we were thoughtful about how we talked to each other and if we were thoughtful about our actions. We talked about how sometimes it's hard to do the right thing when others aren't, and we talked about how good it feels when you take the time to do something, like pick up trash in the hallway or help a friend, just because it's the right thing to do. This week we are all focusing on being thoughtful about our words and actions, and hopefully we will be the group to make that difference here at Bear Creek.

Last week, we participated in five different school spirit days to celebrate Red Ribbon Week. These days helped us have some fun, show our school spirit, and also bring awareness to the fact that drugs and alcohol aren't the answer to problems when we get older. Again, we need to be all of our words of the week: Brave, Responsible, Helpful, Adaptable, and Thoughtful. If we continue to live these words, we will be able to avoid situations where we might encounter drugs and alcohol.

Our favorite of the week was Crazy Hair Day! Check out our pictures --- even the teachers got in on the fun!!

video

School Spirit and Word of the Week

This week's word of the week is thoughtful. Fourth grade has been having some trouble at times when teachers aren't around, so we are working together to be more thoughtful about our words and our actions.

On Monday we talked about this quote from Margaret Meade, a famous anthropologist during the 1960's:


We changed the word citizens to students, and we changed the word world to school. And then we talked about how things might change if we were thoughtful about how we talked to each other and if we were thoughtful about our actions. We talked about how sometimes it's hard to do the right thing when others aren't, and we talked about how good it feels when you take the time to do something, like pick up trash in the hallway or help a friend, just because it's the right thing to do. This week we are all focusing on being thoughtful about our words and actions, and hopefully we will be the group to make that difference here at Bear Creek.

Last week, we participated in five different school spirit days to celebrate Red Ribbon Week. These days helped us have some fun, show our school spirit, and also bring awareness to the fact that drugs and alcohol aren't the answer to problems when we get older. Again, we need to be all of our words of the week: Brave, Responsible, Helpful, Adaptable, and Thoughtful. If we continue to live these words, we will be able to avoid situations where we might encounter drugs and alcohol.

Our favorite of the week was Crazy Hair Day! Check out our pictures --- even the teachers got in on the fun!!

video

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Multiplication Suggestions

Today everybody moved on to practicing multiplication facts. While each student received flashcards for their current level, you aren't expected to do flashcards every night. Here are some fun ways to practice your facts.

1. The Dice Game: Get two dice, and use masking tape to cover the numbers on one die. Write the numbers 7-12 on that die. Roll the dice and multiply the two numbers together. The highest product gets a point. The first person to 15 points wins!

2. Multiplication War: Played like regular war, but you flip two cards instead of one. Every card is face value, while jacks, queens, and kings are worth 10. The person with the highest product wins the cards. If the products are equal, do "I De-Clare War" and add the 4 cards together. The highest sum gets all cards.

3. Egg Carton Game: Get an empty egg carton and number the spots 1-12. Add two pennies, and close the lid. Shake the carton. Open it up and multiply the numbers where the pennies landed.

4. Skip Counting: Multiplication is really all about skip counting the multiples of a number. Have your child practice skip counting in any way. You can actually make them skip while they count by their fact number (2, 4, 6, 8, 10.....), they can write / paint / draw their multiples when skip counting, or if you're looking for some messy fun you can write the skip counting in shaving cream! Skip counting is a great strategy that the kids can use during their fact tests.

These are four simple ways to get started reviewing or practicing those facts. If you have any great ideas you'd like to share, please let me know and we'll add them to the list.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

We Are Water

We started off the school year learning about fresh and salt water bodies of water, and then we learned that fresh water bodies of water can be either lentic systems (bodies of water that stand still) or lotic systems (bodies of water that move from one place to another). But a huge question remained. Where exactly does all of the water come from?? How do we get all of that water into those bodies of water?

This week we started answering those questions by starting our unit on the water cycle. We learned that precipitation is water that falls from the sky, and it falls in the form of rain, snow, sleet or hail. Once it falls to the earth's surface, precipitation can become runoff, it can be part of a collection (as a puddle or one of our bodies of water), or it can become ground water.

Take a look at the videos below. The students in the Bair's Den became water drops and experienced runoff and collection. Ask your child to explain the process to you while you watch!

The Bair's Den AM - Runoff and Collection
video

The Bair's Den PM - Runoff and Collection

video


Dot Day

On September 15, people from all over the world celebrate International Dot Day. If you've never read the book The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds, it's a short and sweet picture book where a student learned the power of having somebody believe in you, believing in yourself, and paying it forward.

The Bair's Den celebrated Dot Day on September 16 this year. As a class, we talked about all of the things that you're saying about yourself or thinking about yourself when you say, "I can't." Our class believes that when you say you can't, you don't believe in yourself. You don't even try things so you don't know what you CAN do. If you say I can't, it means you don't respect yourself because you won't even give yourself a chance. These were important lessons that got added to our wall of learning, and we look at them often.

This story inspired all of us to make our own dots, and as we worked we thought about the mark we wanted to make on Bear Creek this year. We also thought about how many times we say, "I can't," and made our own goals to start saying, "I'll try," or, "I can!"

Please enjoy our dots.... the official picture and our silly, goofy, wacky selves.







Wednesday, September 14, 2016

How to Disagree

We have been very busy learning all sorts of important strategies and routines for working independently in the classroom. There are 4 different stations students will be working on during our guided math group time: fun facts, challenges, problem solving, and technology. Over the course of the next week, I'll be posting information about each of the different stations and what you can do at home. But here are some quick summaries of the different stations:

  • Fun facts is designed to help the students become more confident and fluent with their facts so computation becomes easier. This is an individualized station where students work on their own personal level.
  • Challenges like the broken calculator and challenge 24 get us thinking about numbers in different ways.
  • Problem solving is our most challenging station. These multi-step problems require us to use many different math and thinking skills. Our goal is not necessarily to get these problems correct; the goal is to try a variety of strategies.
  • Technology is another individualized station where students work on our fourth grade skills at their person level. While we will be using Study Island, our biggest focus will be a website and app called Front Row.
Now you may be wondering, what in the world does this have to do with the post title, How to Disagree? In addition to learning these important math routines, we've also been learning what it takes to be a good teammate. Our second word of the week is respectful, and while it's easy to be respectful when you're having fun and agreeing with others, disagreements are a different story. 

While I could take the time about how to disagree, I thought Kid President said it really well. After we watched his take on disagreeing, we talked about each step and added them to our wall of learning. Hopefully this year we can learn to disagree and still treat people well. Check out what Kid President has to say!

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Free Bear

It was a very exciting day in 4th grade because we got to experience our first Free Bear! What is Free Bear you ask? Well, every cycle day 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, from 12:10 - 12:40, all of 4th grade attends a clinic. The clinics are interventions to provide extra support and enrichment to push students' thinking. But on Day 6.... on this wonderful day, students who've earned it by following the Code of Conduct and getting their work done get to choose the activity they'd like to experience. Choices include:

  • dodgeball
  • nature walk
  • computers
  • movie
  • sidewalk chalk
  • legos
  • board games
  • Challenge 24 
  • drawing
  • yoga
  • puzzles
While we didn't get to see any animals on our nature walk today (a group of about 50 makes being quiet a bit challenging!), we did get a chance to check out a really cool plant that we call a Touch Me Not. We realized that the plants at Bear Creek have very unique ways of spreading their seeds. The cattails go from looking like giant corn dogs to GIANT Q-tips. Touch Me Nots are very unique as well. Their seeds grow in pods. The pods grow bigger and bigger until..... well, you just need to check out our slow-motion video below to see what happens! It was a great day to be a 4th grader at Bear Creek. We can't wait for the next Day 6!

video

Brave

This year, my homeroom will be focusing on a different word each week during our class meeting. As we thought about which words we wanted to focus on, it seemed like there would be no better word than the word brave to start off the year. We all need to be brave when we start a new school year, and we all need to be brave as we meet new groups of people. There's a lot of things we want to be brave about. Check out our slideshow below to see how we all hope to be brave at home, at school, or in the future!

video

Monday, August 29, 2016

Great First Day

We had a great first day in the Bair's Den! Team Kit Kat (4A) stayed in their morning classes all day because we attended several stations to help us learn about Bear Creek, and boy.... was there A LOT to learn!

First we got our homework folders because we had tons of paperwork to take home. Families, please check your child's homework folder for your contact paper and medical form. These should be filled out and returned as soon as possible.

After getting all of those papers situated, we went up and learned about the cafeteria (so many choices, so many things to remember) and recess. We even got to play a little bit on the playground! After our small break we headed down to check out the science lab and learned about all the different things we can do during Bear Time. We'll have reading clinics, band and orchestra will meet during that time, and on Day 6 we have Free Bear! Ask your child to tell you all about this. In the afternoon we had another session to learn about the walking path and how to act while out there.

Probably the most fun we had was a team building activity to learn each other's names. We stood in a circle, picked a person, said their name, and threw a bean bag at them (gently!). Once everybody had a chance to throw to somebody, we tried it again. Then we did it a little faster. And then it got crazy because Mrs. Bair kept adding in more and more bean bags!!! We didn't quite understand how this was a team building activity because we only really learned one person's name, and to be quite honest, things got really silly. Kids described their feelings as frustrated, tiring, fun, nerve wracking, crazy, confused, excited, and emotional. Whoa..... that doesn't sound like team building!

So we started to talk and think about what was easy and what was hard about the activity and how it relates to our class. When there was only one beanbag, it was really easy, but the more that was happening the harder it got. In reflecting on this lesson, our classmates came up with these ideas about how this activity relates to what happens in the class:


  • It's okay to make mistakes. Sometimes there's a lot happening at one time, and you're going to make a mistake. You just have to keep going.
  • You have to focus on yourself. If you followed your own pattern in the game, it was easier not to mess up, but if you worried about everybody else things got messed up.
  • You have to think about how your actions affect other people. If you threw the bean bag too high or didn't say somebody's name, your action messed somebody else up and that could mess up the whole game.
  • Sometimes you have to think about other people's perspectives or opinions. Just because you like something doesn't mean it's fun for everybody.
Pretty cool, huh? Sometimes it's not just about learning math and reading at Bear Creek. :)


Thursday, August 25, 2016

Open House

It was great to see so many of my Bair's Den friends this afternoon at our Open House. I was so excited to meet all of you, and I'm pretty proud of how many names I got right! Don't worry if you couldn't make it - we have many seats left, and we are all ready for everybody to come in and get comfortable.

One job today was to finish the prompt, "I am excited for 4th grade because...." Check out everybody's answers!

I agree with all of those things, and there are even more great things you'll learn about Bear Creek.

Many families asked, "What do we need for Monday?" Honestly, you don't need anything. Our team has all of the supplies you will need. You just have to bring a backpack, your smiling face, a healthy snack since we eat lunch so late, and sneakers since we have Phys Ed the first day of school. What if you want to bring some of your own supplies? Pencils and pencil boxes, special homework folders, and magnetic locker decorations are fine. We ask you not to bring large 3 ring binders or Trapper Keepers because we really don't have enough room for them. If you did get one, it would be a great tool to help your child stay organized at home.

I hope everybody has a wonderful weekend, and I'm looking forward to seeing everybody next week!

Monday, August 15, 2016

Welcome to the Bair's Den!

Hi everybody, and welcome to The Bair's Den! I am looking forward to having each of you in my class, and I hope you are just as excited as I am to be starting a new adventure at Bear Creek School!

Please check back here every day, and you will be able to find out a little bit more about our classroom, see some pictures, and find out more about what our days will be like in The Bair's Den!

All of our specials will be held from 11:25 - 12:10. Each day I will update our homework page and the community portal to remind you which special we will have the following day so you can help your child remember their sneakers, recorders or library books if needed. Here is the special schedule (as of this post) that we will follow:


  • Day 1 ~ Phys Ed / Health
  • Day 2 ~ Library
  • Day 3 ~ Technology
  • Day 4 ~ Phys Ed / Health
  • Day 5 ~ Music
  • Day 6 ~ Art

As you can see, we will have Phys Ed on our first day, so please be sure to wear or bring sneakers. We also eat a very late lunch (12:40 - 1:25) so we have a snack time each morning. As of right now, I am not aware of any food allergies in our classroom, but I will notify everybody if and when I become aware of any. A piece of fruit (apple, banana), goldfish, and pretzels are all all great snack ideas to start the year.

I'm hoping that all of you will be able to come and join me on Thursday, August 25 from 2:00 - 3:30 PM for our Open House. Come and see the school, visit the classroom, make your name tag, and meet some new friends.


I cannot wait for our new year together to begin!

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Math Carnival

On Monday, May 16 the kids of the Bair's Den attended a math carnival. Students in Mrs. Sweigart's morning class picked topics that we learned about throughout the year in math class. Then they designed a carnival game that incorporated some way of using math skills and some way of playing a fun game. We spent 30 minutes trying out all of the game. They really tested our math skills, and we had a lot of fun playing the games and winning prizes! Thanks to Mrs. Sweigart's class for inviting us to the math carnival!


Division facts - know your fact, throw the dart, win a prize!

Fraction board game race

Spin, play, win!

Geometry Memory

Algebra Tic Tac Toe and Bean Bag Toss

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Surviving the PSSAs



Over the last few weeks, we have been working very hard to complete the PSSAs in reading, math, and now science. All the hard work does have its perks because we have been able to have some time to be creative and to play. We just wanted to share a little snapshot of some of the things we have been doing to "just be kids" after all of our hard work!

We just played! Tag, gymnastics, and learning how to make grass whistle were all fun to try!

We also did some creative indoor activities! While this is one of our successful runs, we had many other attempts at some crazy domino creations!

video


Friday, April 1, 2016

The Scientific Process

This week we started looking at the scientific process in more detail. The scientific process is the steps a scientist takes to come up with a do an experiment. We started by looking at the first two steps: observing and asking questions. Many people think it takes something special to be a scientist, but all you really have to be is observant and curious. You have to look at things carefully, think about what you know, and then ask questions!

To get some hands on experience with this, we split into five teams. Each team was given a wrapped box, and we had to use four of our five senses (no tasting, please) to figure out what was in the box. We are working on being very specific with our observations so we can explain why we came up with the inference we stated for the contents of the box. We ended up finding out that being a scientist can be very challenging, but it is also a lot of fun!

This small orange box made lots of people wonder about the contents!

Although this box was bigger, it didn't feel very heavy.

It was difficult to write our observations because we were all pretty sure we knew what was in this box!

For it's small size, this box was pretty heavy!

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

We Have Eaglets! UPDATED!

The first egg in the Pittsburgh nest has hatched!! You can view them by clicking here!

Here's a screen shot from dinner time tonight (Tuesday) around 7:00 PM. The second egg should be hatching  sometime in the next 12 hours!


The second egg DID hatch around 9:40 last night. Here are some pictures from breakfast time this morning a little after 8:00!




Sunday, March 20, 2016

The State Capitol

On Wednesday, the Bair's Den and the other classes on Team 4A travelled to Harrisburg to tour the state capitol building and the Pennsylvania State Museum.

The capitol was VERY busy, so we didn't get to take the normal tour. We spent just a few minutes on the second level of the rotunda. Even though we were there a short time, it was very obvious that the building really is priceless. There was beautiful artwork, and everything is covered with gold leaf!



The ceiling of the rotunda from the steps - a good view of some of the original artwork and gold leaf
After we left the rotunda, we visited the House of Representatives. Even though they were getting ready to go into session, we were able to learn about how the house members conduct votes, the stained glass windows that represent Pennsylvania's industries and resources, and the GIANT lights! One large light weighs as much as an elephant!

A view of the 203 seats in the House 

An example of one of the stained glass windows in the House of Representatives ~ there are similar windows in the Senate

A man who is 6 foot tall can stand inside these large lights to change the bulbs.
After leaving the House we had just a moment to walk through the Senate chamber before they started their session. It was very beautiful, but we were not allowed to take any pictures. After we finished our tour we were able to visit the interactive welcome center and have lunch before we headed off to the museum.

While there were many exciting things to see in the museum as we completed our scavenger hunts, we were most excited to see the original Charter of 1681. King Charles II of England repaid a debt owed to William Penn's family by giving Penn land instead of money. The Charter of 1681 was the official document written by the King's representative that gave this land to Penn. While there is always a copy of the charter in the museum, this year the original Charter was on display to celebrate the 335th anniversary of PA becoming a colony. It was really cool to hear about the charter, feel the material it was written on (they had a sample), see an example of the King's official seal, and see how different English was written long ago.

The first page of the Charter of 1681 kept in a temperature and humidity controlled case
One of the middle pages of the Charter - there are 4 pages all together

The final page of the Charter - the only signature on the document is in the lower right corner - it is the signature of Pigott, the King's representative who actually wrote the document. The King's seal represented his official signature.
There were some other important documents from the archives as well. One was the actual document that abolished slavery, and the other was the land grant in which the Lenni Lenape tribe agreed to allow William Penn to live on the land that was given to him by the King of England.

Treat between the Native Americans and William Penn

While a busy capitol made for a short tour, we were very lucky to be able to see this incredible documents at the museum. The capitol building and museum are both open to the public to tour if you and your child would like to do more exploring!

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

The Natural Wonders of the World

Thanks to a vote for informational and historical fiction reading, the kids in Mrs. Bair's reading clinic are currently learning about the 7 Wonders of the World. In ancient times, there were seven amazing creations that were dubbed the 7 Wonders of the World. Unfortunately, of those 7, only the Pyramids of Giza still remain. As part of the millennium celebration, a new list was created. And addition to the 7 finalists many other sites around the world were shared as wonders of nature, science, and technology.

Each student in the clinic is going to have the opportunity to pick from this list of 7 wonders, create their own list of questions, and create a presentation to teach the other students about the wonder. While we had some time to check over these during clinic today, many of the kids wanted to look over them at home, too. Below you will find out list, along with some new additions that I thought the kids might be interested in learning about! Happy researching!

Chichen Itza
Great Wall of China
Machu Picchu
Taj Mahal
Colosseum
Petra
Empire State Building
Itaipu Dam
CN Tower
Panama Canal
Channel Tunnel
Golden Gate Bridge

*Great Pyramid of Giza
Space Needle
Willis Tower (Sears Tower)
Burj Khalifa
Niagara Falls

Friday, February 19, 2016

Science Olympics

Yesterday we had a very exciting morning in the Bair's Den. As part of our unit on the scientific process and scientific tools, we have been learning about the different tools that scientists use for measuring and observing. We also talked about the units that are measured by each of those tools.

While it's important to understand what the tools are and what they measure, our most important lesson was HOW scientists use tools. Measuring is a very exact activity, and it takes a lot of time and patience to measure anything accurately.

To practicing our measuring skills we participated in 8 different activities that included the standing long jump, the estimation challenge, the left handed sponge squeeze, the dictionary drag, the paper plate discus, the big head challenge, the right handed cube grab, and the temperature challenge. By completing these challenges, the kids developed their skills using thermometers, measuring tapes, rulers, meter sticks, trundle wheels, balances, and a graduated cylinder.

Take a look at the pictures below to see the Olympics in action!

Grabbing cubes and determining their mass in grams

Estimating and measuring the hallway using a trundle wheel

Measuring how far we jump in the standing long jump

How many grams of force does it take to move a dictionary?

How far will a paper plate fly?

Squeezing water into a graduated cylinder to practice measuring volume

Timing 2 minutes to see the temperature of our hands

Friday, February 12, 2016

The Eagles are Back - Updated!

Today we were excited to find out that the bald eagles are back in their nest! We were able to see them adding many leaves to the nest to prepare for laying eggs! You can follow the eagles 24 hours a day by clicking here!

Thanks to Bronsyn, we have another eagle cam to follow! The Hays eagles are located near Pittsburgh, and they already have laid one egg that they are incubating in their next! You can check out their nest by clicking here.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Owl Pellets Part 2

Last Friday we wrapped up our owl pellets experiment. Not only was it EXTREMELY interesting to discover all of the creatures our owls had eaten, but we also learned some important lessons about scientists. It became obvious pretty quickly that we had to take our time and be quite careful as we were opening our owl pellets. If we went too fast we could break or damage bones, or we could have missed some of the smaller bones completely. If we went too fast, we could also break pieces off the larger bones, especially the skulls.

Bronsyn and Rommel examining their bones

Steph and Hunter working slowly and carefully to discover bones

We all really wanted to see the skulls to try and find out what types of animals we had. By looking at the shape of the mouth and seeing the location of the teeth we could determine whether we had a mole, a shrew, or a mouse.


A pile of bones including a skull, left side of pile, and a hip bone (alone at the top)

After uncovering as many bones as possible none of the groups found remains of birds. Many of our owls had eaten either mice or shrews, but we believe we also found the bones of another small creature, a vole.

It was easy to see why it takes scientists to long to make new discoveries. In order to be safe and use the tools properly, without messing up the experiment, it takes a lot of time and perseverance to complete a task. We are really looking forward to working on more experiments to use tools and hone our scientific skills.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Owl Pellets

Last week we began our unit on the tools and processes scientists use to conduct experiments and learn new thing. We very quickly realized that doing an experiment is more about learning something new rather than actually having the experiment work out the way you thought it would.

In order to put our brand new knowledge into practice, we starting conducting our first experiment that focuses on using tools safely and correctly and following the standard scientific process. We are dissecting owl pellets!!!

Ask your child to tell you about his or her owl pellets, and the steps we took to begin dissecting the pellets. We'll be continuing to explore our pellets the next two days, but to keep you all in the look we wanted you to enjoy these pictures from today!

video

Friday, January 29, 2016

Social Studies Presentations

Throughout the month of January, we have been researching and learning about the physical regions of Pennsylvania. The students got to choose which region they would most like to learn about, and then they worked together to get information about the location, physical features, natural resources, and climate of that region. Today, all of that hard work culminated in our presentations, and we would like to share those presentations with you!

Next week we will take those presentations, and we will use them to help us learn about informational writing, main ideas, and compare and contrast as we write essays to compare the different regions.

We hope that you enjoy our presentations!


The Atlantic Coast Plain - you can also view their Show Me Presentation by clicking here!



The Ridge and Valley Region:



Ridge and Valley poster


The Allegheny Plateau:




Allegheny Plateau poster

The Erie Lowland Region:

Erie Lowlands poster